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Friday’s Work July 26, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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As you will have noticed, I’m not in, so here’s your work for today.

TASK ONE: First off, here’s a quiz and a game based around those Confusing Words we worked on this Monday. http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/words/spelling/recognising/confusingwords/

Complete both the quiz and the games and make a note of your scores.

TASK TWO: You’ll need your JETTY RATS sheet from yesterday. Write a post that contains your answer to the final question. Here’s the question again for those of you who have lost your sheets.

Write an account of spending a day in the Caravan Park with Hunter. Try to match the tone of the novel as best you can. This should be at least a page in length.

TASK THREE: Make sure your Synopsis has been posted and that you’ve commented on at least 4 other people’s synopses.

You should also make sure you’ve completed your “How To Hatch A Plot” sheets and your Sea Captain story.

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Confusing Words July 25, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today, we’re going to look at words that are easily confused with each other. Here are a few examples:

APOSTROPHES

An apostrophe or not?

Look at the groups of words below. The words within each group sound the same or very similar, but one of the words in the group has an apostrophe in it. In each case the apostrophe shows a letter (or letters) is missing. By putting in the missing letters and thinking about the meaning of the words you should find them less confusing.
Word
Meaning
it’s
is short for it is or it has
e.g. It’s been a long, hard day at work.
its
means belonging to it
e.g. The dog hurt its paw.
who’s
is short for who is or who has
e.g. Who’s got the remote control?
whose
means who does it belong to
e.g. Whose is this brown coat?
you’re
is short for you are
e.g. You’re always late for the bus.
your
means belonging to you
e.g. Is this your pair of shoes?
they’re
is short for they are
e.g. They’re waiting for us downstairs.
their
means belonging to them
e.g. Their dog barks all the time.
there
means in that place or is used in phrases such as there is or there are
e.g. The movie theatre is over there.
we’re
is short for we are
e.g. We’re going on holiday next week.
were
is part of the past tense of the verb to be
e.g. We were students.

IS IT AN ‘S’ OR A ‘C’?

Another commonly confused set of words are those that can be spelled with either a C or an S.

Think ‘s’ for the verb and ‘c’ for the noun.
She had lots of practice in running.
noun
She practises every day.
verb
He has a driving licence.
noun
The publican is licensed to sell beer, wines and spirits.
verb
My advice is to run away.
noun
I advise you to stand still.
verb
Now you can go complete the Quiz and the Games here

Holes and Curses (Part Two) July 24, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today, we’re finishing off our posts on Curses from the other day. For those of you who weren’t here or have short memories, here are the tasks again:

TASK 1:

You are to write a post on your blog that answers the following 3 questions:

1) Do we make our own luck or are things laid down for us
(predestination)? Give your reasons for this.
2) Is Stanley being affected by his Grandfather’s curse or is it purely
psychological? Do you think the curse is lifted because Stanley carries Zero up the mountain?

3) What does Stanley really want from life? Tell us about some of his hopes and wishes.

TASK 2:

Write a story (in a post) that describes an incident from your own experience, which could be viewed as either bad luck or a curse coming true. Were you cursed? Have you ever placed a curse on someone else? What would make you want to curse someone? This story should be at least a page long.

Holes and Curses July 20, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today we’re looking at one of the subplots of the book Holes. (Click on the link for a definition of subplot – basically, it’s a story that runs under the main story. Sub means under, like it does in submarine – which really means underwater.)

There are a couple of subplots in Holes, one about “Kissin'” Kate Barlow and one about Stanley’s great great grandfather. We’re looking at the second one today.

Stanley’s great great grandfather refused to obey the Gypsy Zeroni’s request, which then put a curse on Stanley for generations.

TASK 1:

You are to write a post on your blog that answers the following 3 questions:

1) Do we make our own luck or are things laid down for us
(predestination)? Give your reasons for this.
2) Is Stanley being affected by his Grandfather’s curse or is it purely
psychological? Do you think the curse is lifted because Stanley carries Zero up the mountain?

3) What does Stanley really want from life? Tell us about some of his hopes and wishes.

TASK 2:

Write a post that describes an incident from your own experience, which could be viewed as either bad luck or a curse coming true. Were you cursed? Have you ever placed a curse on someone else? What would make you want to curse someone?

Apostrophes July 20, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today we’ll be practising our apostrophes.

Apostrophes have two uses:
1     Apostrophes show you that some letters have been taken out of a word to shorten it.

Do not becomes don’t.
I will becomes I’ll.
Could have becomes could’ve.
 The apostrophe goes where the letters have been removed.
You use apostrophes this way in informal writing. You should not shorten words when you are writing formal letters. These shortened words are called CONTRACTIONS.

NOTE – sometimes words are shortened in an irregular way. The apostrophe, however, is still used to show where letters are missing.
E.G: Will not becomes won’t.

   2     Apostrophes show you that something belongs to something else. To show belonging you add ‘s
The cat’s tail – says that the tail belongs to the cat.
The car’s lights – says that the lights belong to the car.
Tony’s hair – says that the hair belongs to Tony.

Usually the apostrophe goes before the s.
If the owner already ends in s then the apostrophe goes after the s that is already there. You just need to add an apostrophe.

Now try your skills out here. First, play the game and then go on to the quiz. Once you’re done, you can print out a certificate.

1984 Helpful Links July 20, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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The web is full of great resources that pick up on themes from Orwell’s 1984. The internet has a history of being used as a voice of indepence and resistance (of freedom) while at the same time offers new opportunities for governments and institutions to find out exactly what people are doing with their time and what things interest them. (See what I’m getting at here?)

Here are some links to get you started:

1984comic.com Those of you struggling with Orwell’s prose will be pleased to see that work is afoot to transform the book into comic strip form. Unfortunately, only the first 2 chapters have been completed so far. There’s still plenty of great resources here though, including a tonne of relevant links.

1984 meets The Wall A film clip putting the above comic together with music from Pink Floyd’s 1979 concept album. You can download it or watch it online.

Sparknotes Guide to 1984 Very useful for summaries and analyses of the novel.

Orwell.ru
A site abour George Orwell, very rich in content, with a biography, pictures, and numerous articles by the author.
Wikipedia’s in depth analysis of the novel
Wikipedia’s INGSOC article
Newspeak Dictionnary
George Orwell movie and television adaptations
The Orwell Web Source
Related Issues:

George Bush’s War on Language

Big Brother’s Little Brother

This Time, It Really Is Orwellian

What Orwell saw

In defence of ASIO

I’ll add more links as I find them. Feel free to suggest any you stumble across.

Hatching Your Plots July 19, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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This Friday we’ll be sharing our ideas for our stories. You’ve had a week or so to come up with ideas for your characters and plots, so now’s your chance to see what other people think of them. Write a post that tells us what you can see happening in your story. This is called a SYNOPSIS – a brief description of the events in your story. If you don’t want to give away the ending, that’s okay, just tell us everything that leads up to that point.

TASK 1: Write a post containing the SYNOPSIS of your mini-novel.
TASK 2: Visit your classmates’ blogs (AT LEAST 4 of them) and give constructive criticism on their ideas. Use the list of blogs to the left if you don’t have yours set up yet.

WHEN YOU’RE FINISHED:

1) Complete your story about the Sea Captain in Amsterdam from last week
2) Make sure you have completed the activities from your “HOW TO HATCH A PLOT SHEET” This will be due next WEDNESDAY the 26th of July.
3) Spend some time writing your mini-masterpiece.

Commas July 13, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today we’re looking at Commas.

Commas have two main uses.

1) We use them to separate items in a list (you put them where you might pause for breath). Instead of writing ‘This morning I woke up and I ate my breakfast and I had a shower and I caught the train and I walked to school’ (Which sounds silly as you’re repeating ‘and I’ a lot) you would write ‘This morning I woke up, ate my breakfast, had a shower, caught the train and walked to school.’

THE LAST ITEM IN A LIST ALWAYS HAS AN ‘AND’ NOT A COMMA. DON’T USE A COMMA BEFORE AN ‘AND’.

2) We also use commas to ‘flag’ additional information in a sentence. That is, we use them to mark out the bits of a sentence we don’t really need for it to make sense.

eg. Yesterday, which was Wednesday, I ate Fish and Chips.
(Here we don’t really need to know yesterday was Wednesday. This is just useful extra information. The sentence still makes sense if you take it away.)

eg. Tom, his mum’s favourite, was given an extra sausage for dinner.
(Again, we don’t need to know Tom is his mum’s favourite for the sentence to make sense.)

Now, have a go at the game here. Once you’ve finished the game, move on to the quiz. At the end, you print yourself a certificate.

Idea Generator July 6, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Completely lost for ideas for your novel?

Try the random ideas generator.

The Empty Trampoline July 6, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Stuck for a title for your fantastic mininovel? Help is at hand with this easy to use novel title generator!

You might need to know what a preposition is. Don’t worry, it’s much easier than it sounds.

Basically, a preposition just tells us where or when something is. Is it up, down, above, under, inside, beneath, over, below? These are all prepositions.

The book is on the table.
The book is beneath the table.
The book is leaning against the table.
The book is beside the table.
She held the book over the table.
She read the book during class.

The prepositions above are in BOLD

The titles I came up with are:

Title One: Dark Chasms Below Empty Phonebooths
Title Two: The Empty Trampoline
Title Three: The Book Below Dark Chasms
Title Four: Dark Trampoline
Title Five: The Falling Book
Title Six: Yawning Phonebooths
Title Seven: Falling Chasms
Title Eight: Empty Yawning
Title Nine: Yawning for Phonebooths
Title Ten: Falling and Yawning

Apostrophes and Introductions July 6, 2006

Posted by Myke Bartlett in CSC 2006 Classwork Archives.
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Today we’re looking at apostrophes at

http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/words/grammar/

Once you’re there. select “Apostrophes” and then “Games”. You’ll see 2 games. Start with the top one and work through each level. Make a record of your scores.

Once you’ve done this, go to your blogs. Today you will need to write a post that talks about the novel you’re planning to write. Introduce us to your main character. Tell us what the character looks like, how they behave, where they grew up, how old they are and anything else about the character that a reader might find interesting.

You can also tell us what the title of your novel is going to be and what you think the novel might be about.